Jojo Rabbit

Sam Rockwell, Taika Waititi, Scarlett Johansson, Stephen Merchant, Alfie Allen, Rebel Wilson, Thomasin McKenzie, and Roman Griffin Davis in Jojo Rabbit (2019)

JoJo Rabbit (2019)

Directed by Taika Waititi

I really like Taika Waititi’s films. Hunt For the Wilderpeople (2016) and What We Do in the Shadows (2014) in particular remain firm favourites and Thor: Ragnarok (2017) injected more depth in the titular character than two previous outings managed. But when JoJo Rabbit first came up on my radar I have to say I was skeptical. A movie about a 10 year old Nazi in late WWII with an imaginary friend who is Adolf Hitler seemed a little too off beat even for Waititi. I’m happy to admit I was utterly wrong. 

I saw this at the State Cinema in a fairly packed daytime screening and there were many laugh out loud moments. But the laughter is tempered by tragedy, loss and pathos. Adapted by Waititi from the 2004 novel ‘Caging Skies’ by Christina Leunens, (which I haven’t read but I understand is a very serious work) the screenplay is a total joy. There is a scene at the end of the second act that gives so much narrative depth through fairly innocuous dialogue that I was still discussing it an hour after I’d watched the movie. Without giving any spoilers, it involves Stephen Merchant, Sam Rockwell, Alfie Allen, Thomasin McKenzie and Roman Griffin Davies, offering layers of information, drama and tension in a simple setting. 

The titular character is played with wide-eyed innocence by Roman Griffin Davies and his best friend Yorki, by Archie Yates and this was their first big screen experience – well done boys! Scarlett Johansson is Rosie, JoJo’s mother and I think this one of her best performances in a very long time – but I haven’t seen Marriage Story yet. Thomasin McKenzie is excellent as Elsa, the Jewish girl Rosie is sheltering and Taika Waititi is suitably outrageous as the Adolf of Jojo’s imagination. The entire cast works very well and special mention must go to Sam Rockwell, Alfie Allen, Rebel Wilson and Stephen Merchant who are excellent supporting players. Much of the location shooting was done in the Czech Republic and it is beautifully filmed by Mihai Malaimare Jr. Some of the framing in the outdoor scenes are particularly glorious and I loved the costumes from Mayes C. Rubeo. As I expect from Waititi, the editing is precise and, at times reminded me of Edgar Wright, particularly in conjunction with the excellent music choices. 

After the phenomenal mainstream success of Thor: Ragnarok, Taika Waititi has proved he is no flash in the pan director and his handling of what is at times, very difficult material shows tremendous empathy and maturity – a director at the height of his craft. Along with many in the audience, I laughed often, but I was also moved to tears and Jojo Rabbit will stay with me for a long time. 

It’s really difficult when my first trip to the cinema for 2020 is something this good, and I already predict this will be one of my favourite movies of the year. I just hope the rest of the releases I see over the next 12 months are as brilliant.